Monday, September 8, 2014

Ecuadorian Tortillas de Tiesto - Maiz Tortillas in a clay pot


Tortilla de tiesto, or toasted tortillas are traditional for Ecuador and especially for the Andean Kichwa people.

They have long been part of Ecuadorian culinary history and some kinds of versions surely were made even before the first Spaniards came to Ecuador.

The oral and written history tells of Chuiquimarca sisters that sold tortillas de tiesto at the train station over a hundred years ago.

They were called “las longas de maíz negro”, or “longas of black maize”.

Longa in Kichwa means a young man but after the Spanish came it became an insult and pejorative meaning indigenous people.

Tortillas de tiesto are also part of lunch box culture in Ecuador.

Before lunch boxes little children would take tortillas de tiesto with them to school in brown paper bags.

These tortillas don’t spoil easily and maintain their delicious taste, even after they are not warm anymore.

They are also very nutritious and fill the stomach of an active child, unlike the modern French fries or other popular foods.

There are different kinds of tortillas de tiesto, some are made only from corn or maize flour, other just from wheat flour, and some use a mix of both.

The important thing is that the corn or maize tortilla isn’t fried but toasted on a clay pot or pan, without any kind of oil.

This gives the tortillas their special flavor, together with the cheese that is used in the mix.

The tortillas are eaten with black coffee with lots of sugar, or sweet hot cocoa made from chocolate leaf.

I enjoy them with iced tea and a bit of butter on them.

Whichever way you eat yours, they are sure to be delicious.


TORTILLAS DE TIESTO


900 gr of raw corn flour

100 g wheat flour

Butter 200 g

4 egg

Salt to taste

150g warm water

250g cheese (grated)


PREPARATION:

1. In a pan mix the corn flour and wheat flour.

2. Add the butter, salt and eggs one at a time while kneading the flour, add water sparingly until the dough is smooth and workable.

3. Let stand about 10 minutes.

4. Heat the clay pot well and proceed to form the tortillas with hands in the center put a bit of grated cheese.

5. Organize the tortillas loosely around the clay pot and let them cook from the both sides until they are nicely browned. remove from the heat and place in a covered a basket to keep warm.

6. Serve and accompany with your beverage of choice. In Ecuador tortillas de tiesto are enjoyed with brewed coffee or hot chocolate.


Enjoy!

40 comments:

  1. Longa is the feminine version of Longo, a derrogatory name for Indigenous, or Indio(a). Also, what is the "chocolate leaf?"

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    1. In Spanish Longa would be that. But in Kichwa young woman is called Wambra. Longa as word does not exist in Kichwa. Chocolate leaf is as dark chocolate that is sold to make hot chocolate.

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  2. Love the pictures. The tortillas look very tasty.

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  3. I bet part of the reason that these look and taste fo fabulous is the way they are made and the places they are made

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  4. I have never heard of these but they look great and I bet they are tasty topped with butter.

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  5. Looks delicious! Something I could eat everyday!

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  6. These look tasty to me. I love tortillas and am wondering how close in taste they are to the ones sold in supermarkets.

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  7. These look pretty good. They remind me of an Indian fry bread recipe that my mom used to make. Only it sounds much better with the cheese. :-)

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  8. So lovely to see these made in front of you, I bet they tasted so better than shop bought

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  9. The clay pot must be key for the taste but I will have to try them at home anyway. They look similar to pupusas. Yummy!

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  10. Food doesn't get much fresher than that. I love street food.

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  11. I love the way that around the world simple ingredients are given a local touch.

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  12. These look really good. Thanks for sharing the recipe x

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  13. Love the original pictures just amazing .x

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  14. I love how delicious these look and that you posted the recipe. They remind me of Venezuelan Cachapas, which I love and now I'm craving.

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  15. Mm, I love tortillas. I'd be up for trying to makes these...even without the clay pot.

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  16. OOh these look amazing, I am a huge fan of Tortillas x

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  17. I like the idea of putting them in lunch boxes.

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  18. Loving how these tortillas are made! So nice Would love to assist and eat them!

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  19. Oh, they look delicious. I imagine they are so much nicer than the alternative we buy in the supermarket!

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  20. Tradition is the best way to make foods. Photos are great.

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  21. These look yummy. Not sure how we'd make them without a clay pot though?

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    1. You can do them on a pan, just don't fry them but toast them.

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  22. These look very tasty = much better than the tortillas that you can by in the stores

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  23. Thanks for linking up to Pin Worthy Wednesday. Your post has been pinned to our Pinterest group board!

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  24. These look amazing and I love that you can eat them with a coffee, my idea of heaven! I want to visit Ecador now!!

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  25. It's always to learn more about cooking in another culture. Thanks for sharing this recipe with us at Foodie Fridays! They look wonderful, and I love this type of food!

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  26. Love learning something new! While we appreciate your tasty recipe, Outside [the Box] link party is geared toward DIY, Crafty, and Home Decor. We hope to see some of your amazing projects instead!

    Thank you! Megan

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  27. LOVE this! I will have to whip out my clay pot and make some! If only I had a clay pot. I do have a pizza stone. I hope that will work becuase I need to make these!

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  28. These look so tasty! Thanks for linking up to #TheList x

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  29. I live in Crucita, Ecuador and will be renting a house with the traditional wood cooker and clay pots. The recipe sounds good. I am online learning how to use it. Thank you for the recipe.

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  30. I live in Crucita, Ecuador and will be renting a house with the traditional wood cooker and clay pots. The recipe sounds good. I am online learning how to use it. Thank you for the recipe.

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