Monday, April 28, 2014

Gluten-free yucca bread




Yucca may not be a staple in most American homes, but it is a versatile and delicious food that offers a little something different for your lunch or dinner.

And it’s also good for you.

Yucca is low fat and low sodium and has zero cholesterol, it is also source of fiber

And even better yet, it is gluten free.

The simplicity and flavor of yucca dishes make nutritious it perfect for eating regularly.
Yucca plants in the Amazon.
Something important to notice is that when you start eating a new ingredient it may not have much taste at first.

It takes a week or two for the taste buds to get used to new tastes and meanwhile the food may taste quite bland without a good seasoning.

When I first ate yucca, for me, it had no flavor.

I could not understand the enthusiasm of the people around me.

They treated the food like the lost nectar of gods and I only wished I would be able to give it away to someone and not eat it.
cassava
It took some time before I was brave enough to try yucca again.

Luckily the next time it was not in a soup but I was offered yucca bread.

I could not understand how something could taste so good and how it could be the same thing I was given in the soup before.

Yucca bread remains to be my favorite form of eating yucca.

Although yucca tortillas are a good competitor, and I have learned to love mashed, fried and even cooked yucca in various forms.
cassava
Yucca or cassava is native to the tropical areas of the Americas and it is widely grown all over Latin America and the Caribbean.

It has been around, since before Columbus’s arrival, as a staple food of the Taino, Carib, and Arawak population, especially in the form of yucca bread.

Due to its crucial nature to the culture, the natives revered it, a 1554 Spanish historical account describes a ceremony in which a native priest blessed yucca bread and then divided it among the tribal people present.

The recipients then preserved the bread to protect their families from danger throughout the following year.
Making yucca bread. Please don't look at the hair, I wasn't supposed to be in the picture, lol.
Yucca can also be made into several other items, tapioca is actually yucca starch used in puddings and as a thickening agent.

Other preparations include dough for empanadas and tamales, chips, and fritters.

When buying yucca roots look for firm roots, with no soft spots, also buy whole roots that have not had their ends removed.

There are two varieties of yucca – sweet and bitter both of them contain Prussic acid (hydrocyanic acid), which can cause cyanide poisoning.

Cooking or pressing the root thoroughly removes the poison, in Ecuador yucca is always pealed and then grated throughout before cooking it.

Yucca, or cassava, plant.
But don’t be intimidated because you won’t come into contact with bitter yucca in U.S. stores.

Only sweet yucca is sold in American markets fresh or frozen.

Bitter yucca is processed in US into safe edible flours and starches, which in turn are made into breads, pastries and cakes.

To make yucca bread I use ready yucca flour, some people here make their own flour but I find using store bought one lot easier and time saving.

Yucca bread is quite easy to make.
My friend Celia having a taste of the yucca bread.
Mix a pound of yucca or cassava flour with two teaspoons of baking powder.

Then mix two pounds of grated fresh cheese with the flour and add two eggs.

Add a little bit of milk, less than a half cup, into the dough.

The dough needs to be rigid and not running.

Mix everything and roll it into bread rolls.

Put the bread rolls to a pan.
Make small rolls to be sure they'll bake well inside.
Heat the oven to 300 Celsius and bake them until you can stick a toothpick into the roll and nothing sticks into it.

Enjoy!

What you need:

1 pound of yucca flour

2 teaspoons of baking powder

2 pouds of ground fresh cheese (mozarella or something similar)

Little bit of milk

32 comments:

  1. I've hear of yucca bread but not sure I've ever tasted it. How nice that like almost everything else out there, a GF option is available. Nicely done post here!!

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  2. That yucca bread looks good - and I love that your recipe includes cheese. I wonder if they sell yucca flower in my area.

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    1. Yucca flower isn't the same thing, Jenna. Yucca flowers fruit is also edible but you need to know how to prepare it and it is very healthy. But it isn't the same.

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  3. I think your hair looks cute. :) The Yucca Bread sounds interesting, I'd try it (maybe even the Yucca in the soup because I'd be so curious to taste the difference when it's prepared two different ways).

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    1. Thank you! I don't blow dry and here drying takes ages, so I wasn´t really ready to be in picture ;)

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  4. Oh it looks really good, like little flattened english muffins.

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  5. It LOOKS amazing... I'll have to try it!

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  6. I don't think I've ever anything with Yucca in it. Maybe I can find something premade to try it--I have to admit I do not like tapioca.

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  7. yum!! this bread looks divine! we used to have yucca plants in our yard but i had no clue you could make deliciousness from it! thanks for sharing :)

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  8. If Yucca bread tastes anything like yucca fries, i have found a new food.. I had yucca fries for the first time about a week ago, and could not stop eating them.

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    1. Yucca fries are really delicious! I make them from time to time, too.

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  9. i actually grew up eating this kind of rootcrops, i only know the name we used back home but not the english term.so, yucca is the name, glad to know. I love and miss eating this stuff.

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    1. It's yucca, or cassava. I checked and both names seem to be good to go, Sheila.

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  10. Always so much for me to learn from your posts - thanks for that! Love the images:)

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  11. Hmmm... I wonder if there is any relation between the yucca bread and my yucca cane I just purchased. I do not know where the plant originates but when I saw the same word it resignated with me.

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    1. They are the same family, Felicia. But please don't eat your yucca cane's roots ;)

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  12. I learned to eat yucca in Miami, with a Cuban family. I was taught to boil it till soft, then add garlic sauteed in olive oil, and a little lemon juice. Soooooo good. I have to try this bread. Thanks for the info and recipe.

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    1. That sounds amazingly delicious, Gail. In Ecuador you also boil it till soft but here it's sauteed in regular oil without the garlic. Still very delicious!

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  13. I'm not sure I've ever seen Yuca at a Michigan store but I'm guessing I would be better off finding it when I'm in florida. Good to know about it though! I enjoy picking up new foods.

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  14. I always used to get yucca bread from a nearby store... Let me try some on my own now :D

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  15. I've never tried it, but it looks so good. I hope I find some in my travels.

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  16. I have never tried Yucca before. I wish I could try the bread, you make it sound so yummy!

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  17. I've never tried it... but it looks worth trying, the picture makes me hungry.. I would have to look at a wegman's store or something that might have this... can't say no to things that are healthy for you..

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  18. That bread sounds really good! I will have to try this. Thanks for sharing the recipe!

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  19. That sounds very interesting. I've never had anything like that.

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  20. I have never tried or even heard of yucca bread before

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  21. I love to try new things, pinned, and shared, visiting from The Climb.

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  22. I've had Yucca twice in my life & just loved it! Thank you for networking with us on the CLIMB!
    Angie
    godsgrowinggarden.com

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  23. Hi Joyce,
    I love the fact that you always take us on a journey and expose us to wonderful new foods and delectable dishes from Ecuador. I have heard of yucca, but I have never eaten it or new much about how to prepare it for consumption. I am so delighted that you shared this recipe for gluten free yucca bread with us at the the Healthy, Happy, Green and Natural Party Blog Hop! We appreciate it!

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  24. This looks really good! I don't eat wheat and sometimes miss bread so this might be a good replacement. Hopping here from the Great Blog Train. Following you on Bloglovin"

    Marie @ http://asatisfiedspirit.com & http://countedcrossstitchcafe.com

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